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Tag Archives: Gen Y College Debt

Five Things to Do in College to Set You Up for a Great Career

There is an argument raging in this country right now about whether it is the duty of colleges and universities to make young people job-ready. Traditionalists argue that colleges should teach students how to think and help them develop a strong knowledge base, and that career preparation is the purview of career centers and employers. Many others, including President Obama, feel that colleges should take more responsibility for their graduates’ ability to get jobs.…

Waiting for Payday on the College Front

As we’ve discussed in this blog before, the price value relationship of college is being called into question, now more than ever. For many Americans, whether they get financial aid determines whether or not they can attend the college of their choice. This is not a new situation, it is just a lot more common. How do students deal with their need to get the right financial aid package? Followingis a first-hand accountof the experience of Flo Wen, a senior at the Dalton School in New York City.…

More on the College Debt Question

I’ve been writing on this topic for a week now, and it has really struck a chord. Most readers seem to agree that a college education is what you make of it, and if you need to pay out of pocket to attend an elite college, it may be a better idea to attend a state school, or get your degree in increments. The excellent blog post by Joanne Jacobs (thank you to Tracy Brisson for pointing it out), makes the point that those with degrees from elite colleges come away with a brand that speaks for itself.…

Weighing the Cost of College

Early this week I wrote about Gen Y college debt, and put the post up on Brazen Careerist with the question, “If you could do it over, would you attend a less expensive school”. The question really struck a chord. When I was growing up in the late 1970’s most middle class families were able to bear the cost of college because only about 45% of high school students went to college, so it was much less competitive and therefore much less expensive to attend.…