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In the Driver's Seat

Tag Archives: College Loans

Don’t Just Find a Job—Find a Career

Recently a career industry colleague who works with Millenials asked me a question very relevant to our times. She asked, “How do you get college graduates to think not in terms of finding a job, but finding a career?” This question, and the thought process behind it, forms the basis of all my work helping new and recent grads to think about their strengths, interests and proclivities as clues to what their career life should look like.…

Waiting for Payday on the College Front

As we’ve discussed in this blog before, the price value relationship of college is being called into question, now more than ever. For many Americans, whether they get financial aid determines whether or not they can attend the college of their choice. This is not a new situation, it is just a lot more common. How do students deal with their need to get the right financial aid package? Followingis a first-hand accountof the experience of Flo Wen, a senior at the Dalton School in New York City.…

Let’s Make All Majors Employable

In the last couple of years, the price value equation of going to college has been called into question. Blog post after post questions whether a college degree is worth the money—and if that degree is really just for rich people or for those who can qualify for a free ride. Generally speaking, the argument goes as follows: If you are on a professional track, such as medicine or engineering, the value of college is obvious; you’re on a clear path to a job.…

More on the College Debt Question

I’ve been writing on this topic for a week now, and it has really struck a chord. Most readers seem to agree that a college education is what you make of it, and if you need to pay out of pocket to attend an elite college, it may be a better idea to attend a state school, or get your degree in increments. The excellent blog post by Joanne Jacobs (thank you to Tracy Brisson for pointing it out), makes the point that those with degrees from elite colleges come away with a brand that speaks for itself.…

Weighing the Cost of College

Early this week I wrote about Gen Y college debt, and put the post up on Brazen Careerist with the question, “If you could do it over, would you attend a less expensive school”. The question really struck a chord. When I was growing up in the late 1970’s most middle class families were able to bear the cost of college because only about 45% of high school students went to college, so it was much less competitive and therefore much less expensive to attend.…

Gen Y’s College Debt

There’s an article on the front page of today’s New York Times entitled Burden of Loans on College Graduates Grows. This is a good article highlighting a tough problem that’s getting worse. What it doesn’t discuss, however, is the fact that long-term job satisfaction among college graduates is much higher than among those without a college degree. Reasons for this include the fact that those without college degrees are much more likely to work in dead-end jobs to make ends meet.…

In Praise of “Good Enough” Schools

I’ve been interviewing college grads in their 20’s for my upcoming book and career curriculum In the Driver’s Seat: Work-Life Navigation Skills for Young Adults. And one of the things I’m finding is that not everyone who’s “successful” at 28 attended a top college. This is not surprising but definitely merits conversation. Bay Area career coach Marty Nemko has some interesting statistics on his website. For example,  “A study reported in the American Economic Review concluded that even in terms of earnings, “What matters most is not which college you attend, but what you did while you were there.…