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In the Driver's Seat

Tag Archives: career planning

How College Students Can Make the Most of Winter Break

Use your winter break from college wisely--it's a great time to plan your career.

The Interest You Left Behind

We all have subjects that particularly interest us, that capture our attention. It could be a skill, a hobby or just a topic you follow very closely. Try taking note of the articles that attract you online or in the newspaper and you’ll have your answer. Have you incorporated that interest into the job you have today? As much as we are told, to use a trite term, to “follow our passion”, many times life leads us down a different path and we leave that interest behind.…

Don’t Just Find a Job—Find a Career

Recently a career industry colleague who works with Millenials asked me a question very relevant to our times. She asked, “How do you get college graduates to think not in terms of finding a job, but finding a career?” This question, and the thought process behind it, forms the basis of all my work helping new and recent grads to think about their strengths, interests and proclivities as clues to what their career life should look like.…

The False Start

It used to be that, just five or six years ago, you could graduate from college pretty much assured you’d have a job. Of course all that has changed since 2008 and the recession, with close to half of new college grads unable to find a job. From my perch as a career advisor to young adults, I’ve watched two classes of newly minted grads struggle mightily to find starter jobs.…

Networking Oblivion

Are you a good networker, even a great one? Do you invest plenty of time in LinkedIn, steadily building your contacts and sharing posts and other information with the group? Are you a faithful tweeter? Do you tend to see the possibilities in people, wanting to meet them instead of worrying about wasting your time? If this describes you, we are likeminded souls. But the problem with this general approach to networking, as I’ve found, is that things don’t seem to go anywhere in particular.…

Don’t Freelance Too Early in Your Career

I read a post citing research claiming that only 27% of Millenials prefer to work full-time than to freelance. Now granted, this survey was conducted by Elance, a freelancers’ website, but even so, that figure disturbed me. According to the author, the desire to freelance is fueled by the lack of job security in the market, and the difficulty young adults have had in finding jobs during the recession.…

Wisdom from Wall Street

On May 11th I attended the second annual Wall Street Women’s Forum, a great event put on by RegentAtlantic Capital’s Jane Newton. It’s a speaker series bringing together 100 senior women who work on and around Wall Street, to help them navigate their careers while networking with one another. The theme this year was Claiming Your Seat at the Table, and the keynote speaker was Carla Harris, Managing Director at Morgan Stanley and author of the book “Expect to Win”.…

To Be Happy in Life, Find the Right Career

I just read an excellent book called Wellbeing, by the authors of StrengthsFinder 2.0 and the Gallup Poll. These guys have written great books about identifying your strengths so you can figure out how to use them in your career and other areas of your life. Wellbeing assesses the impact of five key elements on a person’s life: Career Wellbeing, Social Wellbeing, Financial Wellbeing, Physical Wellbeing and Community Wellbeing. Among the five elements, Career Wellbeing was found to have the most far-reaching effects; your career influences your enjoyment, or lack thereof, of everything else in your life.…

Gen Y’s Say: I’ll Take Mentoring Over Pay

Since I’m interviewing members of Generation Y for my new practice and book helping young adults connect school and work, I’m privy to all kinds of career-life constructs that makes this generation stand out from, say, the Baby Boomers. To illustrate, one of my new contacts wrote a blog post suggesting that Gen Y’s will gladly take a pay cut in exchange for great mentoring, because they value the long-term career building opportunity over the short-term gain of more pay.…

Gen Y's Say: I'll Take Mentoring Over Pay

Since I’m interviewing members of Generation Y for my new practice and book helping young adults connect school and work, I’m privy to all kinds of career-life constructs that makes this generation stand out from, say, the Baby Boomers. To illustrate, one of my new contacts wrote a blog post suggesting that Gen Y’s will gladly take a pay cut in exchange for great mentoring, because they value the long-term career building opportunity over the short-term gain of more pay.…