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In the Driver's Seat

Tag Archives: Career Management

The Interest You Left Behind

We all have subjects that particularly interest us, that capture our attention. It could be a skill, a hobby or just a topic you follow very closely. Try taking note of the articles that attract you online or in the newspaper and you’ll have your answer. Have you incorporated that interest into the job you have today? As much as we are told, to use a trite term, to “follow our passion”, many times life leads us down a different path and we leave that interest behind.…

I Found My Career on Twitter

  A question I frequently hear from job-seekers at all stages is, “Why do I need to be on Twitter?” Twitter is a platform for interests of all kinds, and many users abuse its power by over-tweeting—so its value is sometimes misunderstood. But Twitter is an amazing career and job search tool, and can be used to help you pinpoint what you’re interested in and who can help you find the right job.…

The False Start

It used to be that, just five or six years ago, you could graduate from college pretty much assured you’d have a job. Of course all that has changed since 2008 and the recession, with close to half of new college grads unable to find a job. From my perch as a career advisor to young adults, I’ve watched two classes of newly minted grads struggle mightily to find starter jobs.…

What Do You Do and How’d You Get Your Start?

Learn about different fields by asking those you meet about what they do and how they got their start.

Wisdom from Wall Street

On May 11th I attended the second annual Wall Street Women’s Forum, a great event put on by RegentAtlantic Capital’s Jane Newton. It’s a speaker series bringing together 100 senior women who work on and around Wall Street, to help them navigate their careers while networking with one another. The theme this year was Claiming Your Seat at the Table, and the keynote speaker was Carla Harris, Managing Director at Morgan Stanley and author of the book “Expect to Win”.…

Connecting with Those You Know

As my readers know I am a longtime LinkedIn fan, and have been since its inception. It’s an incredible career development, as well as networking, tool. If you look at my profile you will see I have 500+ connections – and I’m proud to say that, virtually to a person, I know every one of them. Of course I know some much better than others, but I’ve met virtually all of them by phone at least.…

To Be Happy in Life, Find the Right Career

I just read an excellent book called Wellbeing, by the authors of StrengthsFinder 2.0 and the Gallup Poll. These guys have written great books about identifying your strengths so you can figure out how to use them in your career and other areas of your life. Wellbeing assesses the impact of five key elements on a person’s life: Career Wellbeing, Social Wellbeing, Financial Wellbeing, Physical Wellbeing and Community Wellbeing. Among the five elements, Career Wellbeing was found to have the most far-reaching effects; your career influences your enjoyment, or lack thereof, of everything else in your life.…

Gen Y’s Say: I’ll Take Mentoring Over Pay

Since I’m interviewing members of Generation Y for my new practice and book helping young adults connect school and work, I’m privy to all kinds of career-life constructs that makes this generation stand out from, say, the Baby Boomers. To illustrate, one of my new contacts wrote a blog post suggesting that Gen Y’s will gladly take a pay cut in exchange for great mentoring, because they value the long-term career building opportunity over the short-term gain of more pay.…

Gen Y's Say: I'll Take Mentoring Over Pay

Since I’m interviewing members of Generation Y for my new practice and book helping young adults connect school and work, I’m privy to all kinds of career-life constructs that makes this generation stand out from, say, the Baby Boomers. To illustrate, one of my new contacts wrote a blog post suggesting that Gen Y’s will gladly take a pay cut in exchange for great mentoring, because they value the long-term career building opportunity over the short-term gain of more pay.…

Summarize, summarize, summarize

One of the things that drives me crazy about resumes–and I look at a lot of them–is when people don’t put a Summary on the top of their resume. A Summary accomplishes two things: It guides the reader so they fully understand a) what you know how to do, and b) what you would like to do with your unique blend of accomplishments. This is not brain surgery, but it does require the author to do the work of reflecting and then articulating what those two items are.…