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Tag Archives: Career Change

Tell Me About Yourself: Talk Your Skills Up in an Interview

Most interviews are in a behavioral format, meaning the interviewer not only wants you to share that you have a particular skill, they want to hear about how you used that skill in past jobs. Practicing your skill story ahead of time will allow you to share it strategically, building it seamlessly into The Story of YOU. First, a quick review of the four steps to telling your story: Start with a theme – a common thread that knits your experience together.…

Tell Me About Yourself: Examples of Narratives That Work

Telling the Story of YOU should be a great experience. It should make you feel like you’ve just had a 5-mile run or a great cup of coffee, or both. Instead, if it feels tortured, nervous-making or rambling, just imagine how the listener feels. This is your story – you get to tell it exactly how you want to, but to get results, it’s ideal to follow a few ground rules.…

The Story of YOU: The Most Fascinating Story Ever Told

  When you talk about yourself, do people listen? Do their eyes glaze over in boredom? Something in between? Knowing what to say, how to say it and, even more importantly, what NOT to say about yourself, is an art, and an important one. Telling your story in a compelling way is one of the most important things you can get right – not only in the job search process and on the job but also in, well, life.…

What Can Informational Interviews Do For Me?

  Over the years there’s been loads written about the value of “informational interviews,” the meetings you, the job-seeker, procure to find out more about an organization you’re interested in, while sort of pretending you’re not actually interested in a job there. These “interviews,” constitute a tricky dance between candidates and prospective employers, prompting many candidates to just throw in the towel and avoid them altogether. But that’s a mistake.…

The Messy Middle of Your Job Search

In my practice working with executives at all levels and millennials starting their careers I’ve noticed that everyone, regardless of experience, finds the middle of their search stressful and difficult. Over time I’ve learned to warn clients about this. Once the exhilarating beginning of the career development or change process is over and we’ve identified an end goal, and the branding and marketing and outreach plan is ready to go, it’s time to wait to hear back from the market.…

Find More Career Happiness in 2018

  Welcome to your job search, 2018! Did you know that being more aware of your natural habits and tendencies can bring you more happiness and productivity in your career? In service to you, I thought I’d start the year off with some of the best productivity ideas I’ve read recently – simple ways of thinking about how each of us goes about our day that can have a big impact on the pleasure and satisfaction we derive from our activities, both at work and at play.…

Want More Interviews? Build Your Career Brand in 4 Steps

So you want a job that pays you to do your best work. You want to be appreciated for your experience, your special abilities and your creativity. You want to work for an organization that aligns with your personal values, a place you can feel proud to call home. Sounds reasonable, right? It is — but you have to do a bit of work. You have to articulate your career brand.…

Get the Feedback You Need to Get Better at Your Job

  I have a 23-year old client who is doing a one year, post-graduate fellowship. During our call this morning he told me that while he enjoys his work it can be slow and that his bosses don’t give him as much work as he’d like. In fact, they expect him to take initiative and suggest work he thinks needs to be done. While he has some ideas for new projects he struggles with how to initiate conversations with his boss who seems so busy with more important work.…

Engineer Your Career: Make Big Career Decisions Using this Simple Process

Try applying “the engineering design process” detailed in Charles Duhigg’s excellent book and you will learn to make better, less binary and more creative decisions. This “methodical approach to problem solving” removes the emotion so we can view our problems more objectively. It’s an excellent tool for defining career problems and coming up with potentially novel solutions. Here’s how I suggest applying the engineering design process to a common problem my millennial clients have: Should I stay in my job or go to grad school?…

Want a Mentor? Don’t Make these Rookie Mistakes

I was listening to one of Tim Ferriss’s excellent podcasts the other day, and he made the comment that the best way to guarantee someone won’t mentor you is to ask them directly to be your mentor. That sounds counterintuitive. But here’s why it makes a lot of sense. Mentoring someone in a formal way requires a lot of time. Scheduling meetings, making introductions to others who can help, answering questions in person and by email – these activities can all add up to a big time suck.…