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In the Driver's Seat

Category Archives: College Career Centers

Make the Holiday Break Count: College to Career Checklist

Whether you’re a college freshman or a junior, the holiday break is an important time to start planning for your summer internship. Banks and consulting firms do their internship hiring in January and February, but even if you’re interested in non-profit, government, start-ups or something non-traditional, now’s the time to get started. Here’s how: Update your resume. But don’t do it in a vacuum. Buy a good resume book like Knock ‘Em Dead Resumes and be sure to have a few trusted friends and family members provide input.…

Five Things to Do in College to Set You Up for a Great Career

There is an argument raging in this country right now about whether it is the duty of colleges and universities to make young people job-ready. Traditionalists argue that colleges should teach students how to think and help them develop a strong knowledge base, and that career preparation is the purview of career centers and employers. Many others, including President Obama, feel that colleges should take more responsibility for their graduates’ ability to get jobs.…

Yes, Your Resume Needs a Summary!

Having a summary on your resume is a must-have for the marketing-savvy job-seeker. Here's why.

New Grads: Yes, You Can Get a Job!

It's a tough time for prospective college grads trying to find their first job. Read this for ideas on how to get some perspective.

Don’t Just Find a Job—Find a Career

Recently a career industry colleague who works with Millenials asked me a question very relevant to our times. She asked, “How do you get college graduates to think not in terms of finding a job, but finding a career?” This question, and the thought process behind it, forms the basis of all my work helping new and recent grads to think about their strengths, interests and proclivities as clues to what their career life should look like.…

Internships Really Do Lead to Full-Time Jobs: One Intern’s Story

Everyone knows how valuable internships are to long-term career planning and ideation. Employers are reluctant to hire college grads who haven’t had work experience because by graduation time, the majority of students have had at least one internship. But what about long-term career prospects? How often do interns get offered full-time jobs? I was heartened to see a report by the National Association of Colleges & Employers for 2012 stating that overall conversion rate for interns to full-time hires has hit an all time high of 58.6%.…

Getting That Great Summer Internship

This is the year to get a great internship, but you need to start right away. There is good news: According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), intern hiring is up 8.5% this year . There is tons of information out there about internships, but what are the key steps a student or new grad needs to know? To help, I’ve distilled them into 5 simple actions. 1.…

Networking Oblivion

Are you a good networker, even a great one? Do you invest plenty of time in LinkedIn, steadily building your contacts and sharing posts and other information with the group? Are you a faithful tweeter? Do you tend to see the possibilities in people, wanting to meet them instead of worrying about wasting your time? If this describes you, we are likeminded souls. But the problem with this general approach to networking, as I’ve found, is that things don’t seem to go anywhere in particular.…

What Works in Any Job Market

I just read a depressing statistic about the job market for new grads. According to a new study by Rutgers University, U.S. college graduates from 2011 have almost half of the graduates from 2010 to compete with in the job market. That is bad news for the career paths of both groups: for 2011 grads they will have more competition for starter jobs. For 2010 grads it means they will have to explain what they’ve been doing for the past year.…

Let’s Make All Majors Employable

In the last couple of years, the price value equation of going to college has been called into question. Blog post after post questions whether a college degree is worth the money—and if that degree is really just for rich people or for those who can qualify for a free ride. Generally speaking, the argument goes as follows: If you are on a professional track, such as medicine or engineering, the value of college is obvious; you’re on a clear path to a job.…